U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
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HHS Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)


Top 10 FAQs

Where can I find a doctor that accepts Medicare and Medicaid?

To find a doctor that accepts Medicare and Medicaid payments, you may want to visit the Centers For Medicare and Medicaid Services' Physician Compare. You can search by State, County, City, Zip Code, and doctor's name and by the name of a Group Practice.

How do I get a new Medicare card if my card is lost, stolen, or damaged? How do I change my contact information?

You can now request a replacement red, white, and blue Medicare card online on Social Security's (SSA) web site. Your card will be mailed within 30 days to the address SSA has on record.

Where can I find low-cost dental care?

There are a variety of resources for dental care, including local health departments, medical insurance programs (public and private), dental schools, clinical trials and state and local resources.

What is the difference between Medicare and Medicaid?

Medicare is a medical insurance program for people over 65 and younger disabled people and dialysis patients. Medicaid is an assistance program for low-income patients' medical expenses.

At what age can a child legally be left alone to care for themselves?

State child abuse and neglect reporting laws do not specify the age at which a child can be left home alone. You may want to contact your local police department or child protective services agency for information about specific local regulations or ordinances.

What is the difference between Salmonella and E. coli?

Salmonella and E. coli are different types of bacteria. Salmonella occurs in raw poultry, eggs, beef, and sometimes on unwashed fruit and vegetables. You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria.

Who is eligible for Medicaid?

In all states, Medicaid provides health coverage for some low-income people, families and children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people with disabilities. In some states the program covers all low-income adults below a certain income level. Additionally, some states have expanded Medicaid to cover more people because of the Affordable Care Act.

How can I complain about poor medical care I received in a hospital?

Bring your complaints first to your doctor and nurses. If you have Medicare, you can file a complaint with your State's Quality Improvement Organization. Talk to your hospital social worker if you believe you are not ready for discharge from the hospital. Billing complaints should be discussed with the hospital or Medicare carrier.

Where can I find information about HIPAA, health information privacy or security rules?

The following materials are found on the Office for Civil Rights website and are available to assist patients and families in understanding HIPAA privacy rights and procedures.

What is the Affordable Care Act?

The name “Affordable Care Act” (ACA) is the name used to refer to the final, amended version of the comprehensive health care reform law and its amendments. The law addresses health insurance coverage, health care costs, and preventive care.

Content created by Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs (ASPA)
Content last reviewed on June 9, 2015