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Bullying

Did You Know?

Sad young woman apart from other people

Location (urban, rural or suburban), school size, and gender do not increase or decrease the risk of bullying.

Adapted from http://stopbullying.gov/teens/index.html

Bullying is a serious problem, but it can be prevented or stopped when those involved know how to address it. Many adolescents have experienced bullying, whether they were bullied, bullied someone else, or saw someone being bullied.1 Although definitions vary, bullying usually involves an imbalance of power, an intent to hurt, and repetition of the behavior.2 Adolescents who bully use their power to control or harm, and those being bullied sometimes feel powerless to defend themselves. Many schools and communities have anti-bullying initiatives in place; new resources are being developed by the federal government and other institutions to help adolescents, parents and others understand bullying and cyberbullying.

Footnotes


1 U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources. (2011). Teens. Washington, DC: Stopbullying.gov. Retrieved August 1, 2011 from http://stopbullying.gov/teens/index.html.
2 U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources. (2011). What is Bullying? Washington, DC: Stopbullying.gov. Retrieved August 1, 2011 from http://stopbullying.gov/topics/what_is_bullying/index.html
Content created by Office of Adolescent Health
Content last reviewed on September 9, 2016