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HHS HealthBeat (August 21, 2014)

Kids, fruits and vegetables

From the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, I’m Ira Dreyfuss with HHS HealthBeat.

Kids can eat fruits and vegetables. The problem is that many don’t. At the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers checked that with national survey data from 2003 to 2010. Researcher Latetia Moore:

“We are seeing some improvement, but there’s still a ways to go. Sixty percent of children are not getting the fruit they need every day, and 93 percent of children are not getting the amount of vegetables they need.”

Dr. Moore says parents can set the example by eating fruits and vegetables, too, and offering them as snacks instead of foods high in salt, sugar, fat or calories. She notes that, for some kids, it could take several tries before they get used to it.

The study is in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Learn more at healthfinder.gov.

HHS HealthBeat is a production of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. I’m Ira Dreyfuss.

Last revised: August 21, 2014