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HHS HealthBeat (July 25, 2014)

What’s depression

From the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, I’m Ira Dreyfuss with HHS HealthBeat.

Everyone feels sad and hopeless sometimes. But when those feelings don’t leave, it may be something more serious – symptoms of clinical depression. Other symptoms include feelings of worthlessness, difficulty concentrating, and a loss of interest in things that were interesting to you. There are others, and you can have depression without having all the symptoms.

The director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Dr. Griffin Rodgers, says people with diabetes are at a higher risk of depression. Other risk-raisers are age, sex and family history.

Dr. Rodgers advises:

“Talk with your doctor if you are experiencing signs of depression, such as feeling very tired, hopeless, or helpless. Many treatments for depression are available. Your doctor will help find the best treatment for you.”

Learn more at healthfinder.gov.

HHS HealthBeat is a production of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. I’m Ira Dreyfuss.

Last revised: July 25, 2014