Skip Navigation
  • Text Size: A A A
  • Print
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Tweet
  • Share

HHS HealthBeat (September 30, 2013)

A teen’s first drink

From the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, I’m Nicholas Garlow with HHS HealthBeat.

A teen’s friend may be the biggest risk factor for having that first drink too soon. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health point to friends of teens as the most significant risk factor for having that first drink, in front of family history and social behavior.

Dr. Samuel Kuperman at the University of Iowa says drinking at a younger age is associated with things like illegal activities.

“Children oftentimes do things they wouldn’t do if they weren’t drunk. So, driving, getting into sexual activity, using other drugs, are all risks that might happen when somebody’s drunk versus not drinking.”

Drinking before the age of 14 is also associated with a risk for young adult alcohol dependency problems.

Kuperman suggests you talk to your kids about drinking and the consequences associated with it.

Learn more at healthfinder.gov.

HHS HealthBeat is a production of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. I’m Nicholas Garlow.

Last revised: September 30, 2013