Project Summary

To advance and accelerate progress in addressing the nation’s childhood obesity epidemic, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC), and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) formed the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR).

Project Team

Team Members
Laura Kettel Kahan, CDC
Rachel Ballard-Barbash, NIH
Tracy Orleans, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Molly Kretsch, USDA
Terry T-K Huang, University of Nebraska
Todd Phillips, Academy for Educational Development


Project Details

In the United States more than 33 percent of children and adolescents are overweight or obese.  Because most obese children grow up to be overweight or obese adults, preventing obesity during childhood is critical.

To advance and accelerate progress in addressing the nation’s childhood obesity epidemic, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) formed the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR).

NCCOR’s mission is to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and application of childhood obesity research in an effort to halt—and reverse—childhood obesity through enhanced coordination and collaboration.

In building on each other’s strengths, CDC, NIH, RWJF, and USDA are advancing the field through complementary and joint projects, such as a $27 million study to evaluate community programs to reduce childhood obesity.

NCCOR is a unique example of how federal agencies are working with each other and with private partners to bring synergy and innovation to address childhood obesity. This public-private collaboration spurs action, provides strategic direction and is building a strong foundation of research to guide the nation’s efforts to prevent and reduce childhood obesity.


Background

HHS Innovates is one of the ways we are building an innovative culture at the Department of Health and Human Services. HHS Innovates is a contest that recognizes and rewards action taken on good ideas. To date, HHS employees have submitted nominations of innovations for nearly 500 exciting new staff-driven innovative projects, and our employees have cast over 60,000 votes to select 42 finalists over seven rounds. This project is one of the finalists of HHS Innovates. Learn more about HHS Innovates.