Modernizing CDC Mortality Data and Analytic Tools

Modernizing CDC Mortality Data and Analytic Tools

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is engaging in a project to create the next generation Electronic Death Registration System (EDRS) to obtain more timely mortality data and provide tools for meaningful analysis of these data.

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The CDC conducts multiple public health surveillance efforts to detect and monitor diseases and conditions, assess the impact of interventions and assist in the management of and recovery from large-scale public health incidents. Today’s ever-present, media hungry environment pressures public health scientists, researchers and practitioners to provide health information on an almost instantaneous basis. This information is used to inform health policy, new health programs, and the general public on various public health issues.
Mortality statistics are one of the most important public health measures to collect. Right now 36 of the 57 US states and territories have an Electronic Death Registry System (EDRS) but not all deaths are reported electronically. CDC is beginning a project to make mortality data available in a more timely manner. In order to accomplish this, CDC will develop an EDRS that can meet the needs of states and the stakeholder communities involved in mortality statistics reporting. Achieving the next generation EDRS will require an evolution in business and systems thinking about electronic reporting, one that minimizes the continuing cycle of expensive and inefficient systems with short “shelf lives”.

In addition to building the new EDRS system, CDC hopes to develop a core set of informatics tools to revamp and improve analytics for mortality data, focusing on surveillance, geographic coding and data visualization. Once developed, CDC will extend the use of these tools to other public health surveillance programs and datasets through the identification and implementation of potential projects.

ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION:
CDC is looking for a strong entrepreneur with a background in technology, specifically software architecture and user-centered design. Below are a list of specific skills and qualifications desired:

  • Technology background – has experience with open source and agile development of software architecture and user-centered design
  • Lateral thinking in developing multiple system models for enhancement and analytics
  • Strong data analyst, experience with data management, large data volumes of both structured and unstructured data
  • Experience with a diversity of analytic tools and approaches for data access and usability
  • Ability to build relationships and coordinate with various stakeholder communities that are geographically dispersed.
  • Past project management experience, especially in design, implementing and measuring the success of pilots
  • Familiarity with healthcare and/or public health experience is useful, but not required

HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?
As an entrepreneur you have the chance to make a meaningful difference in lives of millions of Americans by improving systems for health information. This project offers the chance to develop a unique technological solution for the problem of gathering timely mortality data. You will have the chance to network with individuals across federal government and states.

APPLY NOW  
If this opportunity sounds like a perfect fit you, apply now or share the opportunity with  someone.  Applications will be open from May 5, 2014 – July 16, 2014.

INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
Chesley Richards, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Public Heath Scientific Services
Brian Lee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Public Heath Scientific Services
Delton Atkinson, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics
Tom Savel, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Public Heath Scientific Services
Paul Sutton, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics
Sherry Brown-Scoggins, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics
Rajesh Virkar, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics

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