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Research and Publications

2012  | 2011  |  2010  |  2009  |  2008  |  2007  |  2006  |  2005 |  2004 |  2003  |  2002  |  2001  |  1998


2012

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2011

  • Medicaid and Permanent Supportive Housing for Chronically Homeless Individuals: Literature Synthesis and Environmental Scan
    This report reflects existing published and unpublished literature on permanent supportive housing (PSH) for people who are chronically homeless. It has a particular focus on the role that Medicaid currently plays in covering the costs of the supportive services that help people keep their housing and improve their health and quality of life. In addition to written material, this document incorporates the knowledge of housing and service configurations and ways that providers have been able to cover the cost of supportive services, garnered over our many years in the field.
  • Human Services and Housing Supports to Address Family Homelessness: Promising Practices in the Field (Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation)
    This ASPE Research Brief explores local programs for linking human services and housing supports to prevent and end family homelessness. The Research Brief is based on interviews with stakeholders in 14 communities nationwide, highlighting key practices that facilitated the implementation and ongoing sustainability of the programs. The Research Brief was prepared by Abt Associates under contract with the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.

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2010

  • Homeless Children Roundtable, Conference  (Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation)
    The purpose of the Roundtable (May 2010) was to understand the impact of homelessness on children, identify the resources currently available to address the needs of homeless children, and discuss opportunities for coordination. While other meetings have focused on the adults in homeless families, the Roundtable focused specifically on the children in families that are experiencing homelessness. A diverse group of policy experts, researchers, practitioners, and federal agency staff were invited.
    • Homeless Children: Discussion Synthesis  (Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation)
      This document synthesizes the discussion from the Roundtable on Homeless Children. The background paper from this meeting is also available and provides an update on the research, policy, laws, and funding for programs and services for children who are homeless in the United States.
    • Homeless Children: Update on Research, Policy, Programs, and Opportunities (Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation)
      Despite the knowledge that homeless children face poor outcomes, research has largely focused on the parent(s) in a homeless family, perhaps because these children are still part of a family unit. The children themselves, however, have different and separate needs from their parent(s). Given the impact of the current recession, it is critical to understand the impact of homelessness on our youngest population, and to ensure that resources are mobilized to guarantee that these children's needs are met quickly and thoroughly. This paper provides an update on the research, policy, laws, and funding for programs and services for children who are homeless in the United States. Education, health, and mental health for homeless children are examined.
  • Findings from a Study of the SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access, and Recovery (SOAR)  Initiative  (Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation)
    The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) programs provide critical income support for those who meet eligibility requirements. The SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access, and Recovery (SOAR) initiative aims to improve access to SSI/SSDI benefits for individuals who are homeless through a multi-pronged strategy designed to mitigate the challenges this population faces when navigating the SSI/SSDI application process. To determine how and the extent to which SOAR is achieving its goals, ASPE conducted an evaluation of SOAR. The goals of the evaluation were to (1) provide a comprehensive description of SOAR processes, (2) examine the outputs and some of the short- and long-term outcomes that may be associated with these processes, (3) assess the factors that appear to be associated with successful implementation of the initiative, and (4) describe ways in which the initiative might be improved at either the state or federal level. This report summarizes the findings from the evaluation.

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2009

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2008

  • Characteristics and Dynamics of Homeless Families with Children (Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation)
    This report investigates the availability of data with which to construct a typology of homeless families with the goal of identifying key knowledge gaps regarding homeless families and to consider whether these gaps may most efficiently be filled through secondary analysis of existing data, adding questions or a module to planned surveys that include low-income populations, or whether additional primary data collection would be needed.  Ultimately, it is intended that an improved understanding of the characteristics of homeless families with children will guide the development of appropriate service responses to such families and provide an empirical foundation for the design of homelessness prevention and intervention approaches.  The project consisted of three phases: assessing the availability of already existing data that could be mined through secondary data analysis; proposing a set of questions to modify existing and ongoing surveys that would allow for the key research questions related to homeless families to be answered, and conceptualizing various primary data collections that would specifically collect the kind of data required to develop a typology of homeless families.
  • Evaluation of the Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness (Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation)
    A cornerstone effort of the Administration goal to end chronic homelessness was the development of the Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness (CICH), an innovative demonstration project coordinated by the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, jointly funded by the Departments of Housing and Urban Development, Health and Human Services (HHS: SAMHSA and HRSA), and Veterans Affairs.
    • Summary of CICH Interim Reports
      The summary reviews the background of the study, the methods, client outcomes, and system outcomes.
    • Preliminary Client Outcomes Report, February 2007 
      This report presents data on screening, enrollment, client characteristics across sites, service use over time, and outcomes during the first 12 months of CICH participation. Data are also presented on a comparison group that received some lesser combination of housing and services than the CICH clients.
    • An Evaluation of an Initiative to Improve Coordination and Service Delivery of Homeless Service Networks, February 2007 
      This report examines the service system of the CICH during the first 24 months of the program including the types of housing and service models that were available for the target population and the nature of the interaction between agencies in the CICH.
    • Is System Integration Associated with Client Outcomes?, June 2007
      This report merges network data reflecting collaboration, trust and use of evidence-based practices at the time clients enrolled in the CICH with 12-month client outcome data to examine the association of interagency relationships at the start of the program and client outcome during the first year of program participation.
  • Computer Retrieval of Information on Scientific Projects  (National Institutes of Health)
    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) supports a wide range of studies involving homeless populations because of associations between homelessness and many adverse health conditions. Research projects funded via an NIH grant are traditionally published in scientific journals. To access a full list of research relevant to homelessness currently being supported by NIH and other Public Health Agencies, follow the link to search Computer Retrieval of Information on Scientific Projects (CRISP).  CRISP is a searchable database of federally funded biomedical research projects conducted at universities, hospitals, and other research institutions. The database, maintained by the Office of Extramural Research at the National Institutes of Health, includes projects funded by the National Institutes of Health, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Health Resources and Services Administration, Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, and Office of Assistant Secretary of Health.
  • Toward Understanding Homelessness: The 2007 National Symposium on Homelessness Research  (Department of Health and Human Services and Department of Housing and Urban Development)
    The National Symposium on Homelessness Research, co-funded by the Department of Health and Human Services (both Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation and Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration) and the Department of Housing and Urban Development in FY 2005, sponsored the development of twelve research papers in an effort to capture the current state of the research related to homelessness.  The Symposium event itself, which was held over two days in March of 2007, brought together 200 researchers, policy makers, government officials, service providers, and consumers from across the country to discuss the research papers and directions for future research related to homelessness.  This Symposium was a follow-on event to the first National Symposium on Homelessness Research, which took place in 1998 and was also sponsored by Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Housing and Urban Development.  This volume presents the twelve papers developed and presented at the 2007 Symposium.

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2007

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2006

  • An Evaluation of the Respite Pilot Initiative (PDF - 782 KB)  (Health Resources and Services Administration)
    In May 2000, Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) funded ten Health Care for the Homeless grantees, for up to five years, to enhance their medical respite services for homeless persons. HRSA also supported a prospective evaluation to document the differing models of respite care delivery being used and assess the effect of those respite services on the health of homeless persons. 
  • The DASIS Report: Homeless Admissions to Substance Abuse Treatment: 2004 (PDF - 219 KB)  (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration)
    A short report based on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Drug and Alcohol Services Information System, the primary source of national data on substance abuse treatment. According to SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), more than 175,300 admissions to substance abuse treatment in 2004 were homeless at time of admission. The admissions who were homeless comprised 13% of all admissions for which living arrangements were recorded; an increase from 10% TEDS admissions reported to be homeless in 2000.

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2005

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2004

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2003

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2002

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2001

  • Housing is Health Care: A Guide to Implementing the HIV/AIDS Bureau (HAB) Ryan White CARE Act Housing Policy (PDF - 2.33 MB)  (Health Resources and Services Administration)
    The main purpose of the Guidebook is to provide guidance on funding of housing-related costs under the Ryan White CARE Act.  The Guide focuses on implementation of HAB Policy 99-02, as issued in 1999 by the Health Resources and Services Administration, HIV/AIDS Bureau, which administers the Ryan White CARE Act.  The publication was funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, HIV/AIDS Bureau, with John Snow, Inc. and AIDS Housing of Washington.

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1998

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