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HHS Federal Program Inventory

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Budget Authority (in millions of dollars)

 FY 2012FY 2013FY 2014
Discretionary5,7255,7625,293
Mandatory1,0522951,051

 

4.1    Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

The Immunization and Respiratory Diseases program is charged with preventing disease, disability, and death through immunization and by control of respiratory and related diseases.  The program supports state and local immunization programs to ensure high immunization coverage rates, and provides the scientific underpinnings of vaccine-preventable disease efforts through disease surveillance domestically and globally, vaccine effectiveness studies, vaccine safety monitoring, and preparedness planning.  The program is divided into four divisions:   influenza division, division of viral diseases, division of bacterial diseases, and immunization services division.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Strengthen health care
  • Supported Strategic Objective:  Emphasize primary and preventative care linked with community

4.2    HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD), and Tuberculosis (TB) Prevention

The HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention program is committed to its vision of a future free of HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis, STDs, and TB. The program is responsible for public health surveillance, prevention research, and programs to prevent and control HIV and AIDS, other STDs, viral hepatitis, and TB.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Advance the health, safety, and well-being of the American people
  • Supported Strategic Objective:  Reduce the occurrence of infectious diseases

4.3    Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

The Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases program aims to prevent disease, disability, and death caused by a wide range of infectious diseases. The program focuses on diseases that have been around for many years, emerging diseases (those that are new or just recently identified), and zoonotic diseases (those spread from animals to people). The program’s work is guided in part by a holistic "One Health" strategy, which recognizes the vital interconnectedness of microbes and the environment.

To carry out this mission, the program uses many different tactics:  providing leadership in public health, conducting exemplary science, strengthening preparedness efforts, establishing public health policy, sharing vital health information with the public, and building partnerships.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Advance the health, safety, and well-being of the American people
  • Supported Strategic Objective:  Reduce the occurrence of infectious diseases

4.4    Chronic Disease and Prevention and Health Promotion

The Chronic Disease and Prevention and Health Promotion program is at the forefront of the nation's efforts to prevent and control chronic diseases.  The Program leads the nation’s efforts to create expertise, information, and tools to support people and communities in preventing chronic diseases and promoting health for all.  The Program supports a variety of activities that improve the nation's health by preventing chronic diseases and their risk factors. Activities include one or more major functions:  supporting states’ implementation of public health programs; public health surveillance; translation research; and developing tools and resources for stakeholders at the national, state, and community levels.  Major program areas include tobacco control, arthritis, cancer, diabetes, aging, heart disease and stroke, obesity, oral health, prevention, and reproductive health, among others.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Advance the health, safety, and well-being of the American people
  • Supported Strategic Objective:  Promote prevention and wellness

4.5    Birth Defects, Developmental Disabilities, Disabilities and Health

Birth defects affect 1 in 33 babies and are a leading cause of infant death in the United States. More than 5,500 infants die each year because of birth defects. In addition, over 500,000 children are diagnosed with a developmental disability. The mission of the Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Disabilities and Health program is to promote the health of babies, children and adults and enhance the potential for full, productive living. To achieve its mission, this Program works to identify the causes of birth defects and developmental disabilities, help children to develop and reach their full potential, and promote health and well-being among people of all ages with disabilities, including blood disorders.  The program seeks to accomplish these goals through research, partnerships, and prevention and education programs.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Advance the health, safety, and well-being of the American people
  • Supported Strategic Objective:  Promote the safety, well-being, resilience, and healthy development of children and youth

4.6    Public Health Scientific Services

The Public Health Scientific Services program is the foundation of CDC’s efforts to protect the U.S. public’s health by supporting CDC’s goal of monitoring health and ensuring laboratory excellence. These services lead the development, adoption, and integration of sound public health surveillance and epidemiological practices, and are based on advances in epidemiology, informatics, laboratory science, and surveillance. Investment at the local, state, and national levels is essential to create a public health system in which limited resources can be used most effectively; interventions can be targeted to those most in need; and public health programs can be well-designed. Public health scientific services support efforts across the agency through five main components:  (1) health statistics; (2) laboratory science, policy, and practice; (3) surveillance and informatics; (4) epidemiology and analysis; and (5) professional development.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Strengthen the nation’s health and human service infrastructure and workforce
  • Supported Strategic Objective:  Enhance the ability of the public health workforce to improve public health at home and abroad; Improve national, state, local and tribal surveillance and epidemiology capacity

4.7    Environmental Health

Environmental factors contribute to more than 25 percent of diseases worldwide, including cancer, asthma, and heart disease. CDC’s Environmental Health programs prevent illness, disabilities, and premature death caused by environmental exposures. Long-established expertise in laboratory science, medical toxicology, environmental epidemiology, and environmental public health practice enable CDC to address complex public health threats and respond to natural disasters and human-initiated events. CDC’s environmental health programs serve all Americans, with special focus on the health of vulnerable populations, such as children and older Americans.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Advance the health, safety, and well-being of the American people
  • Supported Strategic Objective:   Promote prevention and wellness

4.8    Injury Prevention and Control

The Injury Prevention and Control program helps protect people from violence and injury. It is the nation’s leading authority on violence and injury prevention and is charged with determining the best ways to prevent violence and injuries, using science to create real-world solutions to keep people safe, healthy, and productive.

Injuries kill more than 180,000 people each year—that’s 1 death every 3 minutes. Regardless of sex, race, or economic status, violence and injuries affect everyone. In the first half of life, more Americans die from violence and injuries—such as motor vehicle crashes, falls, or homicides—than from any other cause, including cancer, HIV, or the flu. And injury deaths are only part of the picture. Millions of Americans are injured each year and survive. Many of them are faced with life-long health, social and financial problems.

Through interdisciplinary research, data collection and analysis, information sharing, and relationships with states, the Injury Prevention and Control program  functions as the focal point for the public health approach to preventing violence and injuries and their consequences, by moving from science into action.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Advance the health, safety, and well-being of the American people
  • Supported Strategic Objective:   Promote prevention and wellness

4.9    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for the prevention of work-related injury and illness.

The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 created NIOSH to help assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by providing research, information, education, and training in the field of occupational safety and health.

The mission of NIOSH is to generate new knowledge in the field of occupational safety and health and to transfer that knowledge into practice for the betterment of workers. To accomplish this mission, NIOSH conducts scientific research, develops guidance and authoritative recommendations, disseminates information, and responds to requests for workplace health hazard evaluations.  NIOSH provides national and world leadership to prevent work-related illness, injury, disability, and death by gathering information, conducting scientific research, and translating the knowledge gained into products and services, including scientific information products, training videos, and recommendations for improving safety and health in the workplace.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Advance scientific knowledge and innovation
  • Supported Strategic Objective:  Increase our understanding of what works in public health and human services

4.10  Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) was enacted to provide compensation and medical benefits to employees who worked at certain Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, including contractors and subcontractors at those locations, and certain of its vendors. 

Adjudication of issues pertaining to all claims for benefits under the EEOICPA is the responsibility of the Department of Labor. The DOL is supported in its role by the DOE, HHS, and the Department of Justice.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Strengthen health care
  • Supported Strategic Objective:  Ensure access to quality, culturally competent care for vulnerable populations

4.11  Global Health

The Global Health program’s overall goal is to ensure global disease protection, improve health globally and protect the American people 24/7 from global health, safety, and security threats that cross international borders. With scientists and health experts embedded in countries around the globe, program staff use their expertise in translating and adapting scientific evidence into guidance and public health action to strengthen public health capacity in partner countries, leading to public health impact. Working with partners, CDC builds strong national programs and sustainable public health systems that can respond effectively to the global HIV/AIDS epidemic and to other diseases that threaten the health and prosperity of the global community at large. CDC uses scientific expertise to prevent disease, disability, and death through immunizations and prevention, treatment and control of infectious diseases that threaten the health of individuals at home and abroad. Through research and science-based public health action and partnerships, CDC addresses health issues, ensures global health security, and achieves safer, healthier, and longer lives worldwide.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Advance the health, safety, and well-being of the American people
  • Supported Strategic Objective:  Reduce the occurrence of infectious diseases

4.12  Public Health Preparedness and Response

The Public Health Preparedness and Response program addresses the overarching goal of protecting Americans from natural and bioterrorism threats. The program works to ensure the security, safety, and health of the United States from threats, foreign and domestic, intentional, and naturally occurring. CDC provides life-saving responses to chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats, as well as other disasters, outbreaks, and epidemics. CDC protects Americans’ health and safety by:  supporting state and local health departments through grants and training, overseeing and regulating deadly toxins to ensure they are safeguarded, providing comprehensive situational awareness by overseeing a national laboratory network and building national tracking and surveillance systems, and preparing for emergency response and recovery by maintaining the Strategic National Stockpile.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Advance the health, safety, and well-being of the American people
  • Supported Strategic Objective:  Protect Americans’ health and safety during emergencies, and foster resilience in response to emergencies

4.13  CDC-Wide Activities and Program Support

CDC-Wide Activities and Program Support funds a range of infrastructure and services for mission-critical activities and programs to function.  The funds support buildings and facilities, public health leadership and support, preventive health block grant program, and Affordable Care Act Prevention and Public Health Fund.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Strengthen the nation’s health and human service infrastructure and workforce
  • Supported Strategic Objective:  Invest in the HHS workforce to meet America’s health and human service needs today and tomorrow

4.14  Vaccines for Children

The Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program helps provide vaccines to children whose parents or guardians may not be able to afford them. This helps ensure that all children have a better chance of getting their recommended vaccinations on schedule. Vaccines available through the VFC Program are those recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. These vaccines protect babies, young children, and adolescents from 16 diseases.

CDC buys vaccines at a discount and distributes them to grantees—i.e., state health departments and certain local and territorial public health agencies—which in turn distribute them at no charge to those private physicians' offices and public health clinics registered as VFC providers.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Advance the health, safety, and well-being of the American people
  • Supported Strategic Objective:  Promote the safety, well-being, resilience, and healthy development of children and youth

4.15  Toxic Substances and Environmental Public Health

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), in collaboration with the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health, is at the forefront of protecting the public from toxic chemicals and exposures, hazardous leaks and spills, environment-related poisonings, and natural and terrorism-related disasters. ATSDR supports healthy, sustainable environments in communities by identifying chemical exposures, educating the public and health care providers, and conducting exposure investigations and health studies. ATSDR also translates environmental health research into community action. Over the past three decades, ATSDR scientists worked in more than 8,000 communities in the United States. Today, communities implement over 85 percent of ATSDR’s recommendations. Health professionals, academia, and communities worldwide use ATSDR’s Toxicological Profiles—considered the “gold standard” for chemical reference—in making public health decisions.

  • Supported Strategic Goal:  Advance scientific knowledge and innovation
  • Supported Strategic Objective:  Increase our understanding of what works in public health and human services

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