Fatherhood E-Learning Module

Overview

Please note: This course will take approximately 60 minutes to complete; do not refresh your browser window or you will have to begin again. Instead, use the next/previous buttons to work your way through the course.

Engaging fathers is a dynamic, ongoing process. This course provides an overview of key insights and data on the unique and irreplaceable role that fathers play in the well-being of their children. Effective father engagement requires consistent and long-term commitment on the part of organizations; this course will better equip you to begin to support fathers and reduce the ill effects of father absence in your community.

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the paradigm shift on involving fathers in childcare; and
  • Understand the scope and negative effects of father absence; and
  • Explore the benefits of father involvement in child development; and
  • Consider opportunities to involve fathers.

This course covers the following key areas:

  • Paradigm shift on father involvement
  • The facts of father absence
  • The benefits of father involvement
  • Male perspectives
  • Challenges for teen fathers
  • Perceptions of father involvement
  • Opportunities to engage fathers

Fatherhood Part 1: Paradigm Shift on Father Involvement

Father Involvement

Involving fathers in child care is a new focus for many programs. This section explores the steps necessary to make a shift towards including fathers in programs and services.

Traditionally, child-focused programs were designed to provide services addressing the needs of the mother-child dyad. These programs were often designed, structured, and staffed primarily by women.

Program evaluations and research continuously document the positive impact of responsible fathering on families and communities.[1]

Among program developers and policymakers, there is a renewed interest and focus on providing supports to better involve fathers in the lives of their children.

“Responsible, engaged fathers are critical to the financial, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual well-being of children, and, therefore to the strength and health of American families and communities.”

— President Barack Obama, Speech delivered Father’s Day 2008, Apostolic Church of God in Chicago

Footnotes

1
Source: The White House, “Promoting Responsible Fatherhood.” June 2012, http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/docs/fatherhood_report_6.13.12_final.pdf

Engaging fathers is a new approach in the maternal/child model of care. Changing an approach from “this is how we’ve always done it” to “we need to be open to change” requires education and effort. It requires helping people move from acknowledging a problem to considering what actions are needed to change it.

Stages of Adoption

Each of us makes decisions throughout the day, generally following an unconscious succession of thoughts that bring us to a conclusion. We follow this decision making model to make simple decisions as well as more complex ones.

The four stages of adoption in a decision making process are:

  1. Awareness—I know there is a problem.
  2. Interest –I want to find out more.
  3. Decision—I have to do something.
  4. Implementation—This is what I am going to do.

The more complex an issue, the more time and information may be needed to move to the next stage.

Where are you? (Awareness, Interest, Decision, Implementation)

Exercise 1

There are several models of decision making. Stages of Adoption is one such model. What are the stages of adoption?

Correct!

Answer: C

Explanation:

  1. The correct answer is C: awareness, interest, decision, and implementation.

Congratulations! You've successfully completed "Part 1: Paradigm Shift on Father Involvement". Please continue to Part 2 by clicking "Next" below.

Fatherhood Part 2: The Facts of Father Absence

Father Absence

Let’s take a look at what the research shows in the US:

  • In 1960, 8 million children lived apart from their fathers.[1]
  • Today, over 24 million children live in homes without their fathers.[2]
  • One out of every three children in the U.S. lives apart from their father.[3]
  • 17% visit their fathers at least once a week[4]
  • 83% see their fathers less than weekly[5]

Children in Father-Absent Homes

In 2009, the U.S. Census found that approximately one in four U.S. children (about 17 million) lived with their mother but without their father.[6]

Of children with non-resident fathers:

  • 17% visit their fathers at least once a week
  • 83% see their fathers less than weekly
  • …and of that 83%, 40% have not seen their fathers at all during the previous year[7]

Footnotes

1
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, “Living Arrangements of Children Under 18 Years/1 and Marital Status of Parents, by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin/2 and Selected Characteristics of the Child for All Children: 2010”. Table C3. Internet Release Date November, 2010. http://www.census.gov/population/socdemo/hh-fam/cps2010/tabC3-all.xls
2
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, “Living Arrangements of Children Under 18 Years/1 and Marital Status of Parents, by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin/2 and Selected Characteristics of the Child for All Children: 2010”. Table C3. Internet Release Date November, 2010. http://www.census.gov/population/socdemo/hh-fam/cps2010/tabC3-all.xls
3
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, “Living Arrangements of Children Under 18 Years/1 and Marital Status of Parents, by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin/2 and Selected Characteristics of the Child for All Children: 2010”. Table C3. Internet Release Date November, 2010. http://www.census.gov/population/socdemo/hh-fam/cps2010/tabC3-all.xls
4
Source: Fagan, J., Laughlin, L., & Farrie, D. (2009). Involvement with children following marital and non-marital separations. Fathering, 7, 226-248.
5
Source: Fagan, J., Laughlin, L., & Farrie, D. (2009). Involvement with children following marital and non-marital separations. Fathering, 7, 226-248.
6
Source: Kreider, R. M. & Ellis, R. (2011). Living Arrangements of Children: 2009. Current Population Reports, P70-126. U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC.
7
Source: Fagan, J., Laughlin, L., & Farrie, D. (2009). Involvement with children following marital and non-marital separations. Fathering, 7, 226-248

Effects on Mothers

Pregnant mothers without the child’s father in the home are:

  • 70% less likely to obtain prenatal care.
  • More likely to experience depression.
  • Less likely to breastfeed.[1]

Effects on Children

Early menarche

Separation or frequent changes in family formation increase a woman's risk of early menarche.[1]

Teen Pregnancy

Women who experience three or more changes in her family environment exhibit higher risk factors and are five times more likely to have an early pregnancy.[2]

Substance Abuse

The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University found that teens living in two-parent families who have fair to poor relationships with their fathers are sixty-eight percent (68%) more likely to smoke, drink, and use drugs than teens living in a two-parent household with a good to excellent relationship with their fathers.[3]

Incarceration

Youth in father-absent households have significantly higher odds of incarceration than those in homes with both a mom and a dad.[4]

“Every child has a hole in their heart in the shape of their father.”

— Roland Warren, President, National Fatherhood Initiative

Footnotes

1
Source: Albrecht, C. and Teachman, J. D. Childhood Living Arrangements and Risk of Premarital Intercourse.” Journal of Family Issues 24 (October 2003): 867-894.
2
Source: Quinlan, R. J. “Father absence, parental care, and female reproductive development.” Evolution and Human Behavior 24 (November 2003): 376-390.
3
Source: National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse XIV: Teens and Parents. Columbia University. August 2009.
4
Source: Harper, C.C. and McLanahan, S. S. “Father Absence and Youth Incarceration.” Journal of Research on Adolescence 14 (September 2004): 369-397

Sorry!

You must correctly answer the questions in all previous sections before proceeding.

Exercise 1

Mothers in father-absent homes are what percent less likely than mothers who live with fathers to get adequate prenatal care?

Correct!

Answer: C

Explanation:

  1. The correct answer is C: 70%

Exercise 2

The risks to children who grow up in father-absent homes include (select all that apply):

Correct!

Answers: A, B, and D.

Explanation:

  1. The correct answers are A, B, and D. /li>

Congratulations! You've successfully completed "Part 2: The Facts of Father Absence". Please continue to Part 3 by clicking "Next" below.

Fatherhood Part 3: The Benefits of Father Involvement

Father involvement benefits the child, the mother, and the community as a whole.

Premature infants whose fathers spent more time playing with them had better cognitive outcomes at age three.[1]

At six months old, children whose fathers had been actively involved from birth scored higher on a test of mental and motor development than children whose fathers were not involved during the first eight weeks.  They also managed stress better during their school years. [2]

Adolescents between the ages of 14-19 have higher self-esteem and less depression when they have greater intimacy with their fathers.[3]

African American boys with married parents were found to have higher self-esteem, self-control, and feelings of personal power compared with boys who had only their mothers in the home, even when income, parental education, and the number of people living in the home were controlled.[4]

Footnotes

1
Source: Yogman MW, Kindlon D, Earls FJ, “Father Involvement and Cognitive Behavioral Outcomes of Premature Infants,” Journal of the American Academy Child and Adolescent Psychology 34 (1995): 58-66.
2
Source: Pfiffner LJ, McBurnett K, Rathouz PJ, “Father Absence and Familial Antisocial Characteristics” Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol. 29, No. 5, 2001, pp. 357-367
3
Source: Field, T., et al. “Adolescents’ Intimacy With Parents and Friends.” Adolescence, 30.117 (Spring 1995): 133-140.
4
Source: Mandara, J. and Murray. C.B.. “Effects of Parental Marital Status, Income, and Family Functioning on African Adolescent Self-Esteem.” Journal of Family Psychology, 14 (2000): 475-490.

In two-parent families, father involvement exerts a distinct and independent positive influence on whether children get mostly "A"s, enjoy school, do not have to repeat grades, and participate in extracurricular activities, even after accounting for the mother’s involvement.[1]

In a study of third and fourth graders, a father’s provision of warmth and control was positively related to higher academic achievement.[2]

Greater father involvement also reduces the likelihood that children in 6th through 12th grade have ever been suspended or expelled from school.[3]

According to a study by the Department of Education, when fathers are actively involved with their children, the children:

  • Have higher school performance.
  • Have higher SAT scores.
  • Have 38% higher grades.
  • Demonstrate greater ambition.
  • Participate in extracurricular activities.
  • Enroll in college at a higher rate (daughters specifically).[4]

Footnotes

1
Source: U.S. Dept. of Education, National Center for Educational Statistics, Father Involvement for Healthy Child Outcomes: Partners Supporting Knowledge Development and Transfer, March 1, 2007.
2
Source: Coley, R. L. “Children’s Socialization Experiences and Functioning in Single-Mother Households: The Importance of Fathers and Other Men.” Child Development, 69 (February 1998): 219-230.
3
Source: Coley, R. L. “Children’s Socialization Experiences and Functioning in Single-Mother Households: The Importance of Fathers and Other Men.” Child Development, 69 (February 1998): 219-230.
4
Source: U.S. Dept. of Education, National Center for Educational Statistics, Father Involvement for Healthy Child Outcomes: Partners Supporting Knowledge Development and Transfer, March 1, 2007.

Father involvement has a direct effect on a child’s behaviors.  Differences in the levels of positive involvement have significant effects on the behavioral outcomes of the child. Overall, it is more beneficial when the father lives in the home with the child.[1]

Fathers’ emotional involvement in the lives of their children can lead to less gendered roles. Traditionally feminine activities such as sewing, cooking, jumping rope, and art were more common for both boys and girls when a father was involved. Hence, a father’s approval may be effective in removing the stigma attached to femininity in any form, particularly for boys.[2]

Research tells us that a father influences his children in many ways, including:

  • The intellectual ability of his children.
  • The behavior of his children.
  • His children’s ethnic heritage.
  • The occupational choices his children will make.
  • The ways his children will parent their children.[3]

Children learn to be more empathetic when there is a father in the home. Father involvement creates a buffering effect, making it less likely that his child will bully others and also equipping the child to better recover if he or she is bullied.[4]

“In many ways, I came to understand the importance of fatherhood through its absence — both in my life and in the lives of others. I came to understand that the hole a man leaves when he abandons his responsibility to his children is one that no government can fill. We can do everything possible to provide good jobs and good schools and safe streets for our kids, but it will never be enough to fully make up the difference.

“That is why we need fathers to step up, to realize that their job does not end at conception; that what makes you a man is not the ability to have a child but the courage to raise one.”

— President Obama on the 100th anniversary of Father’s Day, June 21, 2009

Footnotes

1
Source: Carlson, M.J. Family Structure, Father Involvement and Adolescent Behavioral Outcomes. Working Paper #05-10. Princeton NJ: Center for Research on Child Well-Being, 2005: 2, 20-23.
2
Source: Deutch, F. M., Servis, L.J. & Payne, J.D. “Paternal Participation in Child Care and Its Effects on Children’s Self-Esteem and Attitudes Toward Gendered Roles.” Journal of Family Issues, 22 (November 2001): 1000-1024.
3
Source: FATHER FACTS, 6TH EDITION • © 2011 National Fatherhood Initiative
4
Source: Flouri, E. and Buchanan, A. “Life Satisfaction in Teenage Boys: The Moderating Role of Father Involvement and Bullying.” Aggressive Behavior. 28 (2002): 126-133.

Sorry!

You must correctly answer the questions in all previous sections before proceeding.

True or False: Premature infants whose fathers spent more time playing with them had better cognitive outcomes at age three.

Correct!

Answer: The correct answer is True.

Explanation:

Father involvement is critical to cognitive development.

True or False: In a study of third and fourth graders, a fathers’ provision of warmth and control was negatively related to academic achievement.

Correct!

Answer: The correct answer is False.

Explanation:

Fathers were positively related to higher academic achievement.

True or False: Higher levels of father involvement have been linked to higher levels of aggression in adolescent boys.

Correct!

Answer: The correct answer is False.

Explanation:

Lower levels of involvement have been linked to higher aggression levels.

Congratulations! You've successfully completed "Part 3: The Benefits of Father Involement". Please continue to Part 4 by clicking "Next" below.

Fatherhood Part 4: Male Perspectives on Teen Sex & Fatherhood

In 2009, Seventeen Magazine, in partnership with the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, conducted a survey of 1200 males ages 15-22. They labeled the results as “surprising” due to the fact that many of the results didn’t fit into the accepted stereotypes.[1]

  • One in five (21%) say they’ve been pressured by a girl to go further sexually than they wanted to (17% of younger men, 25% of the older group).
  • Nearly one in four (23%) admit they’ve lied about having sex to get friends to stop pressuring them about having sex.
  • More than three-quarters (78%) agree that there is "way too much pressure" from society to have sex.
  • Nearly three out of four (73%) say they have more respect for girls who say no to sex.
  • More than half (56%) say they are "relieved" when their female partner wants to wait to have sex.
  • 83% would gladly wear a condom if a girl asked (only 6% would refuse).
  • 66% would gladly go get birth control with a girl if she asked (only 11% would refuse).
  • Two-thirds of young men (65%) who have talked to their parents about preventing pregnancy say it was helpful. Unfortunately, only slightly more than half (53%) report having had such conversations.
  • Young men are more comfortable talking to their moms about their feelings (how to treat girls, their feelings about girls, etc.), but want to talk with their dads about sex and protection.[2]

Other research findings also challenge stereotypes about teen boys:

  • 90% of teen males believe that male responsibilities include talking about contraception, using contraception, and taking responsibility for a child they fathered.[3]
  • Approximately two-thirds of teen boys agree that it is better to get married than to go through life single, compared to just over half of teen girls.[4]

Footnotes

1
Source: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/resources/pdf/pubs/thatswhathesaid.pdf
2
Source: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/resources/pdf/pubs/thatswhathesaid.pdf
3
Source: Urban Institute Publication - Involving Males in Preventing Teen Pregnancy, 1999.
4
Source: Flannigan, C., Huffman, R., & Smith, J. , Teens' Attitudes Toward Marriage, Cohabitation, and Divorce, 2002, in Science Says. 2005, The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy: Washington, DC.

Sorry!

You must correctly answer the questions in all previous sections before proceeding.

Exercise 1

What percentage of teen males believe male responsibilities include: talking about contraception, using contraception, and taking responsibility for a child they fathered?

Correct!

Answer: B

Explanation:

  1. The correct answer is B: 90%.

Congratulations! You've successfully completed "Part 4: Male Perspectives on Teen Sex & Fatherhood". Please continue to Part 5 by clicking "Next" below.

Fatherhood Part 5: Challenges for Teen Fathers

Teen fathers have a unique set of challenges. Although there are many support programs designed to address the teen mother’s needs, there are few support systems designed to assist the teen father with his challenges.

Limited Contact with Children

In a study of 45 children of mostly white teenage fathers in a mid-sized urban area in Oregon, only 42% were living with their fathers at 18-24 months of age. Fully 40% no longer had any contact whatsoever with their fathers.[1]

Low Academic Achievement

Poor academic performance was the strongest predictor of who would later become an unwed, teenage father.[2] 

Less than half of all young men who have fathered children in high school finish high school. Those who do are highly unlikely to seek any higher education.[3]

Lack of Self Worth

Teen depression often takes the form of anger and irritability, making it difficult for parents as well as social service providers to see that depression is the force at work.[4]

Boys are particularly susceptible to suppressing feelings because society does not validate feelings in boys. A boy can become the subject of ridicule if he expresses feelings he may be having. [5]

Footnotes

1
Source: Fagot, B. I., Pears, K.C. Capaldi, D.M., Crosby, L. & Leve, C.S. “Becoming an Adolescent Father: Precursors and Parenting.” Developmental Psychology, 34 (1998): 1209-1219.
2
Source: Fagot, B. I., Pears, K.C. Capaldi, D.M., Crosby, L. & Leve, C.S. “Becoming an Adolescent Father: Precursors and Parenting.” Developmental Psychology, 34 (1998): 1209-1219.
3
Source: 2004 Kids Count Data Book: Moving Youth From Risk to Opportunity. Baltimore, MD: The Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2004: 11.
4
Source: Berlinger, N.T. Rescuing Your Teenager From Depression: New York: Harper Resource, 2005, pp 304.
5
Source: Berlinger, N.T. Rescuing Your Teenager From Depression: New York: Harper Resource, 2005, pp 304.

Sorry!

You must correctly answer the questions in all previous sections before proceeding.

What percentage of all young men who have fathered children in high school finish high school?

Correct!

Answer: D

Explanation:

  1. The correct answer is D: 49%.

Congratulations! You've successfully completed "Part 5: Challenges for Teen Fathers". Please continue to Part 5 by clicking "Next" below.

Fatherhood Part 6: Perceptions of Father Involvement

The following section explores both mother and father attitudes about father involvement. Let’s explore the attitudes on fathering that were found in these surveys.[1] Although these surveys were focused on adults, these attitudes were intensified in the teen population. Moms and dads agree that there is a father absence crisis. Over 50% of mothers expressed the belief that fathers are replaceable, both by mothers (55%) and by other males (66%).

Footnotes

1
Surveys available from: http://www.fatherhood.org

What Dads Think:

  • Only a third of dads strongly agree with the statement that they have all the necessary skills and knowledge to be good fathers.
  • Only half of dads reported that they felt ready to be fathers when they first became fathers.
  • Over half of dads feel they are replaceable.[1]

What Moms Think:

  • Moms not living with dads reported "lack of knowledge about how to be a good dad" as the biggest obstacle to good fathering and "lack of parenting resources designed specifically for fathers" as 3rd highest. These obstacles ranked 3rd and 4th for moms overall.
  • Moms not living with dads were very dissatisfied with dad’s performance.[2]

Footnotes

1
Source: Pop’s Culture: A National Survey of Dads’ Attitudes on Fathering 2010
2
Source: Mama Says: A National Survey of Mothers’ Attitudes on Fathering 2009

Moms and dads disagree on the obstacles to father involvement.

Dads Think The Obstacles Are:

  1. Work responsibilities
  2. Media/popular culture
  3. Financial problems
  4. Lack of knowledge
  5. Child’s mother

Moms Think The Obstacles Are:

  1. Work responsibilities
  2. Dad’s relationship with own dad
  3. Lack of knowledge
  4. Lack of parenting resources for dads
  5. Lack of support from relatives/friends 

In today’s culture of social media and high-speed internet, the messages reaching adolescents are often uncensored and inappropriate. TV dads are often portrayed as immature and less-than-intelligent followers who are rarely looked to for advice or guidance. Unfortunately, many young men may lack the appropriate role models.

The underlying message from the media is that dads are not very important or necessary which is completely contradicted by research studies documenting the critical role fathers play in helping children grow and develop.

Sorry!

You must correctly answer the questions in all previous sections before proceeding.

What percentage of mothers think that dads are replaceable by moms?

Correct!

Answer: A

Explanation:

  1. The correct answer is A: 55%.
Moms and dads agree that the number one obstacle to father involvement is:

Correct!

Answer: D

Explanation:

  1. The correct answer is D: work responsibilities.

Congratulations! You've successfully completed "Part 6: Perceptions of Father Involvement". Please continue to Part 7 by clicking "Next" below.

Fatherhood Part 7: Opportunities to Engage Fathers

Barriers to father engagement include:

  • Strong Maternal/Child model of care.
  • Assumption that fathers should know they are included.
  • Primarily female-run programs.
  • Staff fear or biases around engaging teen fathers.
  • Lack of programs for teen dads.
  • Lack of male social service providers.
  • Organizational policies that prevent engagement.
  • Intake process that requires limited information on fathers.
  • Staff capacity to expand services to fathers.

 

There are many ways for your organization to engage fathers in programming.

Engaging fathers begins with a holistic approach to becoming father-friendly. Father inclusion should be a priority for the entire organization’s agenda and be stressed in leadership development, program development and community engagement.

Get Started

  • Assess how well your organization is currently doing at engaging fathers and create an action plan based on the results of the assessment. Sample assessment tools are available at Fatherhood.org.
  • Pull together an advisory team to develop ways for the organization to intentionally focus on fathers to increase their involvement.
  • Share research about the important role fathers play in helping children grow.
  • Promote the belief that fathers can learn how to be involved, responsible, and committed dads.
  • Assess staff on their ability to engage fathers as a performance metric.
  • Offer continuing education for staff on engaging fathers.
  • Educate mothers on the importance of father engagement for child well-being.

“The primary task of every civilization is to teach the young men to be fathers.”

-Margaret Mead

Fatherhood Summary

This section includes the conclusion, a summary of each section and resources.

This course provided you with an overview of the challenges and opportunities of including fathers in programs and services. Engaging fathers and achieving a sustainable paradigm shift towards father inclusion requires an ongoing effort on the part of the entire organization.  

In the effort to reduce teen pregnancy, men (whether they be the teen father, the father of the teen mother or a potential father) need to be equally and intentionally included in programs and services.

This course covered the following key areas:

Paradigm Shift in Father Involvement

  • Traditionally, child-focused programs were designed to provide services addressing the needs of the mother-child dyad.
  • There is a renewed interest and focus on engaging and involving fathers in the lives of their children. Engaging fathers is a new approach in the maternal/child model of care.
  • Stages of Adoption is one decision-making model that can describe the paradigm shift towards including fathers. The four stages are awareness, interest, decision and implementation.

The Facts of Father Absence

  • One out of every three children in the U.S. lives apart from their father. The number of children in father-absent homes has increased from 8 million in 1960 to over 24 million today.
  • 40% of children in father-absent homes see their fathers less than once weekly.
  • Mothers who lack the father as a partner are less likely to breastfeed and/or seek prenatal care.
  • Children who grow up in father-absent homes are more likely to engage in substance abuse, become teen parents, and be convicted of crimes.

The Benefits of Father Involvement

  • Children who grow up with fathers have higher self-esteem, educational success, and pro-social behavior.
  • Differences in the levels of involvement have significant effects on the behavioral outcomes of the child.

Male Perspectives

  • Seventeen Magazine, in partnership with the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, conducted a survey of 1200 males ages 15-22.
  • Boys responded that there was too much pressure for them to have sex.
  • Over 90% of boys surveyed agreed that male responsibilities include talking about contraception, using contraception, and taking responsibility for a child they fathered.
  • Most teen boys found conversations about sex and contraception with their parents helpful, but many have not had these conversations.

Perceptions of Father Involvement

  • Moms and dads agree that there is a father absence crisis.
  • Both moms and dads feel that dads are replaceable, either by moms or by other men.
  • Moms and dads agree that work responsibilities are the number one obstacle to father involvement. They disagree on other obstacles.
  • Moms not living with dads are very dissatisfied with the dad’s performance.

Challenges for Teen Fathers

  • Challenges for teen fathers include lack of strong role models, lack of social supports, and lack of resources.
  • Poor academic performance is the strongest predictor of who will later become an unwed, teenage father.

Opportunities to Engage Fathers

  • Engaging fathers begins with a holistic approach to becoming father-friendly. Father inclusion should be a priority for the entire organization.

 

Fatherhood Final Exam

Sorry!

You must complete all the Learning Exercises correctly in Parts 1-7 before you can take the Final Exam.

You have nearly completed the Fatherhood E-Learning Module!

To finish the module and download a customized certificate of completion, you must correctly answer 8 of the following 10 questions. After you have submitted your answers, click "Submit Final Exam" to see your results. If you didn't pass, don't worry -- we'll let you know which ones you missed and give you another try.

Question 1

Why is there an increased focus on father involvement in children’s lives? Select all that apply.

Correct!

Answer: A, C, and D

Question 2

According to U.S Census Bureau figures, the number of children living without a father in the home has increased from 8 million in 1960 to 24 million in 2010.

Correct!

Answer: True.

Question 3

What ratio of children in the U.S. currently live in fatherless homes?

Correct!

Answer: B

Question 4

Which of the following statements are true? Select all that apply:

Correct!

Answer: A and C

Question 5

True or false: Children learn to be more empathetic when there is a father in the home. Father involvement creates a buffering effect, making it less likely that his child will bully others and also equipping the child to better recover if he or she is bullied.

Correct!

Answer: True

Question 6

Which of the following statements reflect the ideas and feelings of teen males who were polled about sexuality? Select all that apply.

Correct!

Answer: A, B, and D

Question 7

Which of the following statements are true for teen fathers? Select all that apply.

Correct!

Answer: A, B, and C

Question 8

True or False. Mothers and Fathers agree that the biggest obstacle to more father involvement is work responsibilities, and they also agree that the second biggest obstacle is lack of knowledge.

Correct!

Answer: False

Question 9

There are many opportunities to improve engagement of fathers. Some ways to do this include. Select all that apply.

Correct!

Answer: A, C, and D

Question 10

Eliminating the barriers is also important to engage more fathers. Some of the barriers include. Select all that apply.

Correct!

Answer: B and C

You have completed the exam!

Your Score

  • Total Correct:
  • Toal Incorrect:

Congratulations! You've successfully completed the Fatherhood E-Learning Module!

You are now eligible to download a certificate of completion. To do so, fill out the form below and click "Generate!". Your certificate will download automatically, and a backup copy will be sent to you via email.

You did not achieve the required score. Click here to try again.

Receive our updates by entering your E-mail address below.

Last updated: February 06, 2014