Teen Pregnancy and Childbearing

DID YOU KNOW?

Did You Know? The majority of adolescents want to avoid a pregnancy. 4 in 5 adolescent males would be 'a little or very upset' if he got his partner pregnant.

The majority of adolescents want to avoid a pregnancy. 4 in 5 adolescent males would be "a little or very upset" if he got his partner pregnant.

Latest estimates reveal that more than 750,000 teen girls in the United States learn they are pregnant each year.[1] Although this number is the lowest in U.S. history, it is still higher than many other developed countries, including Canada and the U.K.[2] Teen parents face multiple risks for poor life outcomes: often, they fail to finish high school and are more likely to be poor as adults.[3] In all, one in six 15-year-old females will give birth by her 20th birthday and this number is higher for black and Hispanic adolescents. [4],[5] Children born to adolescents face particular challenges—they are more likely to have poorer educational, behavioral, and health outcomes throughout their lives, as compared to children born to older parents.[6]  Teen pregnancy is an issue that many people are working to address. One of HHS Secretary Sebelius’s key priorities is to reduce teen and unintended pregnancy.

Interested in talking with your teen about teen pregnancy and childbearing?  Click here for advice on how to talk about teen pregnancy prevention and puberty

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[1]Guttmacher Institute. (2010). U.S. teenage pregnancies, births and abortions: National and state trends and trends by race and ethnicity. Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute. Retrieved January 7, 2011, from http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf
[2]Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2011). Preventing teen pregnancy in the US. Retrieved May 13, 2011, from http://www.cdc.gov/VitalSigns/TeenPregnancy/index.html
[3] Hoffman, S. D., & Maynard, R. A. (Eds.). (2008). Kids having kids: Economic costs and social consequences of teen pregnancy (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press.
[4]Abma, J. C., Martinez, G. M., & Copen, C. E. (2010). Teenagers in the United States: Sexual activity, contraceptive use, and childbearing, National Survey of Family Growth 2006-2008. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital and Health Statistics, 23(30). Retrieved February 15, 2011, from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_23/sr23_030.pdf
[5]Welti, K. (2010). Child Trends' analysis of National Vital Statistics System birth data. Washington, DC: Child Trends.
[6]Hoffman, S. D., & Maynard, R. A. (Eds.). (2008). Kids having kids: Economic costs and social consequences of teen pregnancy (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press.
Last updated: August 04, 2014