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Advisory Committee on Blood Safety and Availability Recommendations - September 2002

DATE: August 24, 2004

TO: Interested Parties

FROM: Jerry A. Holmberg, PhD, Executive Secretary for Advisory Committee on Blood Safety and Availability

SUBJECT: Advisory Committee on Blood Safety and Availability Recommendations - September 5, 2002

The Advisory Committee unanimously made five Recommendations to Secretary Thompson on September 5, 2002. Minutes, transcripts and presentations are posted on the Committee's web site (http://www.hhs.gov/bloodsafety).

  1. Whereas fair payment to hospitals for blood/blood components, transfusion services, and transfusion laboratory procedures is essential to ensure that Medicare patients have access to the best possible care; The Advisory Committee recommends that the Secretary of Health and Human Services direct the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to establish 2003 Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system payment rates for blood/blood components, transfusion services, and transfusion laboratory procedures based on current-year acquisition and actual total costs of providing such products and services, rather than on hospital outpatient claims from previous years.

  2. Whereas the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (HOPPS) no longer provides for adequate reimbursement of these lifesaving therapies, the Advisory Committee recommends that the Secretary of Health and Human Services direct the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) that payment for plasma derived therapies and their recombinant analogues be based on current-year acquisition and actual total costs of providing such products and services both within hospitals and in non-inpatient settings (including the physician office) to ensure patient access to care.

  3. DHHS should promote increased public awareness of the ongoing need for routine blood donations by heathy persons via:

    1. periodic PSA's and visible blood donations by top officials and paid advertising campaigns;

    2. funding of demonstration projects to optimize use of educational and other behavior-influencing approaches;

    3. supporting specific initiatives to encourage routine donations by young persons and minorities or part of general messages on healthy life-style and community support;

    4. play a leading role in increasing participation of federal employees in donating blood;

  4. DHHS should maintain and/or increase funded support for blood supply monitoring to address:

    1. long term trends in blood collection and use;

    2. data on daily nationally distributed blood inventories;

    3. indicators of blood shortages and excesses;

    4. predictive models to identify trigger points for coordinated national donation campaigns;

    5. coordination of governmental and non-governmental initiatives.

  5. DHHS should support initiatives to improve management of blood inventories including:

    1. defining the role(s) of liquid and/or frozen reserves

      1. to moderate fluctuations in supply, and

      2. to improve disaster response preparedness

    2. integration of supply forecasting into intervention strategies directed to correct imbalances in supply and need, and;

    3. strategies to facilitate movement of blood from area of surplus to areas of shortage.